Archive for the ‘Dog Health’ Category

Preventing Canine Heartworm Disease

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Many of us are already aware that mosquitoes have the potential to spread diseases in humans. West Nile Virus has received significant attention, and mosquitoes may also carry Eastern Equine Encephalitis. Fortunately, none of these conditions affect dogs very often. Still, dogs are not completely immune to mosquito-borne disease. Heartworm, a very serious condition, is of foremost concern. What is Heartworm? Heartworm disease is as scary as it sounds. It is a severe and potentially fatal disease caused by parasitic worms that like to live in the heart and the arteries of the lungs of many types of mammals. Heartworms…

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Canine Distemper

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What is Distemper? Canine distemper is a virus that affects a dog’s respiratory, gastrointestinal, respiratory and central nervous systems, as well as the conjunctival membranes of the eye. Distemper Symptoms The first signs of canine distemper include sneezing, coughing and thick mucus coming from the eyes and nose. Fever, lethargy, sudden vomiting and diarrhea, depression and/or loss of appetite are also symptoms of the virus. Puppies and adolescent dogs who have not been fully vaccinated are most vulnerable to the distemper virus. Rescues with unknown vaccination histories can also be vulnerable to this disease. Serious infections are most often seen…

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Lilly’s Rehabilitation

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Our friend, Dr. Karen R. Pearson, DVM at Greenbriar Veterinary Hospital and Luxury Pet Resort has a beautiful pup named Lilly. Lilly was a graduation present from her parents, aunt, and uncle from veterinary school. Lilly is now almost 13, and starting to show signs of old age. Dr. Pearson says Lilly has taught her a lot about being a veterinarian and even more about being a pet owner. Dr. Pearson has been diligent about doing annual blood tests, exams, and recommended vaccinations, but Lilly is starting to get very weak in her legs. She can’t get up the stairs as easily and first thing in the…

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Let’s Talk About Rabies

Rabies is a preventable viral disease of mammals most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal. The vast majority of rabies cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) each year occur in wild animals like raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes. Rabies is a 100% vaccine-preventable disease. However, despite the availability of tools to manage the disease, rabies prevails to cause tens of thousands of deaths every year. The disease disproportionately affects poor, low-resource communities, particularly children with 4 out of every 10 human deaths by rabies occurring in children younger than 15 years. What…

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Venomous Snakes in Maryland

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This is Samantha who was bitten by a snake this morning. Her family got her to us and treatment was started within an hour of the incident, she seems to be responding well to the treatment. Here is more information about venomous snakes in our area and good recommendations – The copperhead and timber rattlesnake are venomous snakes that can be found in Maryland. During the day, the snakes are most likely to lie underneath objects to take cover from the hot summer sun. Their natural camouflage can make them difficult to detect if they are lying in leaves or…

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Fleas, Pesky Little Creatures

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Get Rid of Fleas in Your Home, Step by Step Is your dog or cat is scratching a lot lately? Have you seen something small and black jump from the sofa onto your arm? Don’t freak out, take charge of the situation. Call the Veterinarian Is your pet on a flea control program? If they are, read the instructions again. It’s easy to miss a step. Ask your veterinarian what they recommend. You want a product that treats fleas at every stage — from egg to adult bug — and one that works well in your climate. Most flea treatments…

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FOXTAILS

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I admit I cringed when I was asked to write a blog. Writing for me can be a joy, but only if I am inspired. Inspiration does not come on demand. I was fairly confident it would not be visiting me too often, then, I thought of foxtails. Suddenly, the idea of a blog did not seem such drudgery after all. Recently, foxtails have become the subject of intense interest for us. These only started appearing as an issue in our practice 2 years ago. I remember learning about foxtails in veterinary school 22 years ago. At that time, foxtails…

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The Truth …… Can Giving My Dog Ice Water Cause Bloat?

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Written by Dr. Karen Pearson, DVM Greenbriar Veterinary Hospital & Luxury Pet Resort Can giving my dog ice water cause bloat? Simple answer… no. Longer answer….Gastric dilatation-volvulus(GDV) or bloat is a result of the dog swallowing too much air, fluid or both and the stomach “twists”.  It is not caused by a spasming of the stomach as the article would suggest. The stomach would actually have to twist to cause the bloat and not allow air to escape from the stomach. It is much more likely the dog gulped water down too quickly and with the big gulps, swallowed a lot of air…

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Snake Bite Risks To Dogs!

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Do you know much about your dog’s risk of getting a snake bite? We generally think of poisonous snakes in the jungles of Africa or South America, but poisonous are common in North America, especially in the southeast and southwest United States. Although the northeast has less poisonous snakes to deal with in the area they are still here and a concern for pet owners. Coral snakes have short fangs and tend to “chew” venom into the wound.  Vipers have longer fangs that they use to inject venom deeply into the underlying tissues.  In general, poisonous snakes can be identified…

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Practice Basic Pet Summer Safety

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    Practice Basic Pet Summer Safety The weather has finally started to warm up. Here are some basic safety tips to help keep your pets safe this spring and summer: Never leave your pets in a parked car Not even for a minute. Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees….

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