Archive for March, 2013

Easter Pet Safety And Hidden Dangers To Pets

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Easter Pet Safety & Hidden Dangers To Pets As you and your family prepare for Easter festivities here are some Easter Pet Safety tips. 1. Easter grass is a decorative must for Easter baskets but can signal danger for your pet if ingested. If eaten it can cause several health problems even death. Easter grass can wrap around your pets intestine and cut off circulation. It can also cause vomiting, choking, constipation, painful defecation and abdominal pain. Instead opt for a safer alternative, tissue paper or real grass. 2. No Chocolate! Dogs can’t resist something sweet to gobble on, including…

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Dog Profile Of The Week – The Norwich Terrier

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The Norwich terrier is one of the smallest of the working terriers, weighing 11 to 12 pounds. The height is ideally 10 inches at the shoulder. The body is long and the head is fox-like. A Norwich generally matures at one year, with full size attained between 6 and 8 months. The Norwich coat is short, harsh, wiry and straight. The breed has a definite undercoat. This dog sheds twice a year and requires brushing and combing twice a week. The color can be red, wheaten, black and tan, black and gray, or red and white mixed in a grizzled…

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Leptospirosis In Pets

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Leptospirosis is a serious and potentially fatal bacterial disease that can be transmitted to humans. The disease typically attacks the kidneys and liver of infected dogs. It is transmitted to dogs through contact with contaminated water, soil, or surfaces. Localized outbreaks may occur in areas that have recently experienced flooding. Infected dogs require treatment with antibiotics and fluid therapy. The risk of infection can be reduced by attempting to avoid high-risk environments; vaccination of individual dogs may be recommended. What Is Leptospirosis? Leptospirosis is a potentially serious disease caused by the bacterium Leptospira interrogans. It affects dogs but can also…

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Dog Breed Profile Of The Week – Dachshund

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All three varieties of dachshunds — the smooth-, wire- and long-coated — are found in two sizes called standard and miniature. Miniatures are not a separate AKC classification but compete in a class division for “11 pounds and under at 12 months of age and older.” Weight of the standard size is usually between 16 and 32 pounds. There is no height standard for the dachshund but they are usually under nine inches in height. All three types are known for their long backs and short muscular legs, which explains the unflattering nicknames “sausage hound” or “hot dog.” They also…

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Interesting Dog Facts

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Interesting Dog Facts: A dog’s heart beats between 70 and 120 times a minute, compared with a human heart which beats 70 to 80 times a minute. A dog’s normal body temperature is 100.5 to 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit. A female carries her young about 60 days before the puppies are born. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the smallest dog on record was a Yorkshire Terrier in Great Britain who, at the age of 2, weighed just 4 ounces. The longest lived dog, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, was an Australian Cattle Dog, named Bluey,…

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Dog Breed Profile Of The Week – Newfoundland

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The Newfoundland is a large, heavy-coated dog. The male is 28 inches tall and weighs from 130 to 150 pounds (59 to 68 kilograms). The female is slightly smaller at 26 inches tall and 100 to 120 pounds (45 to 54 kilograms). The outer coat is coarse and flat and has an oily, water-resistant quality that is perfectly suited to the dog’s strong desire to be in the water. The undercoat is soft and dense and requires daily brushing; they shed excess hair year round. Newfoundland colors are black, black with white, and brown with white splashes on the chest…

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Interesting Cat Facts

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Interesting Cat Facts On average, cats spend 2/3 of every day sleeping. That means a nine-year-old cat has been awake for only three years of its life. Unlike dogs, cats do not have a sweet tooth. Scientists believe this is due to a mutation in a key taste receptor. When a cat chases its prey, it keeps its head level. Dogs and humans bob their heads up and down. The technical term for a cat’s hairball is a “bezoar.” A group of cats is called a “clowder.” Female cats tend to be right pawed, while male cats are more often…

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